INDUSTRIES WE SERVE
OST Team
Careers
Locations
Alliances
Featured Customers
Awards
Manufacturing & Distribution
Healthcare
Finance & Insurance
Public Sector
Cloud & Data Providers
Enterprise Technology
Design
Advisory Services
Application Development
Data Analytics
Internet of Things
Managed Services
Data Center Modernization
Configuration Services
News & Events
Blog

Part III: How do you justify an investment in IoT?

July 7, 2016

How do you justify an investment in IoT is Part III of the “IoT… are we all doing it wrong?” series. Check out Part I and Part II, then come back next week for part IV, why utilizing a layered testing approach is key in building an IoT platform.

IOT-Appliances

 

The Wall Street Journal recently published an article about GE Digital. To quote that article, “But the busi­ness case is to sell the prod­ucts [with IoT enablement] to its in­dustrial cus­tomers–like air­lines, power util­ities and hos­pi­tals — that are strug­gling to wring greater pro­ductiv­ity out of heavy ma­chin­ery in a time of slow global economic growth.”

At the Evanta CIO event OST participated in Minneapolis in June, the CEO of Ecolab, Doug Baker, described how with the advent of IoT and broad-based data collection for a variety of products, that the total material costs in which a customer pays may actually go down, which means they will save energy, water, and buy less product from Ecolab. So how does a company justify an investment in IoT when it will result in customers buying less product?

Like GE, it means that you will provide higher value to your customers, and that you will use the data provided by the systems to justify continued partnership and investment, and demonstrate that while you might be spending more per unit, that you will be spending less overall. It also introduces new opportunities for service lines that have never been imagined before. That’s what Ecolab is talking about, what GE is doing, and what some OST customers are conceptualizing.

I had a conversation with Rob Siegel, a lecturer at Stanford, over lunch on Thursday. He stated that the new digital economy with the data exhaust of billions of transactions, users and devices will create new economic models for the sale, lease and consumption of the products historically purchased as capital or consumable products. Companies must be able to creatively think about how new technology creates the opportunity for new business models. Investing in IoT solutions is a way for organizations to provide value to their customers beyond what was once even considered possible. It likely means looking at their business in a new way, and adapting to accommodate new processes. 

At OST, we are finding ways to help guide our customers through this journey of business transformation. Whether it is XaaS in the data center and cloud, or new business lines created around the solutions we build, helping the client envision this creates greater opportunity and differentiation for them.

From Design to Data Center: IT will work with our help.

 

Jim VanderMey

Chief Innovation Officer

Jim VanderMey is the Chief Innovation Officer for OST. Jim has provided the technical leadership and product strategic planning for the organization since the very beginning. Jim is a technology visionary who sets the long and short-term direction for OST. He specializes in seeing the “big picture” of technology, the computer industry, and the business objectives supported by IT. As OST has gained an international reputation, Jim has taught and spoken at conferences in Europe, Japan, and throughout North America.

Jim attended the Grand Rapids School of Bible and Music as a pastoral ministries major, and went on to manage significant scale applications and infrastructures in the healthcare, manufacturing, and insurance industries. He has served as a consultant to many large organizations such as Herman Miller, Boeing, Priority Health, Magna-Donnelly Corporation, Hewlett Packard, Amway, Meijer, Komatsu, Mercedes, Navistar (International Truck), Flextronics, the US Navy and many hospital systems including Spectrum Health, Bronson Hospital, and HealthEast.

Jim has senior level data center skills in performance analysis and systems architecture, enterprise UNIX, reliability engineering, SAN design and implementation. He is a voracious learner and has held many technical certifications ranging from UNIX and Cisco administration through cloud architecture and design. As OST has grown and diversified, Jim has engaged with clients on product strategy, IT transformation, cloud enablement, CIO-level organizational change management, DevOps and IoT program leadership. Creating value by connecting the Data Center disciplines of the past to the Design-centric disciplines to help businesses leverage technology more effectively is a place of special focus for Jim in his recent engagements.

Jim has been heavily involved in OST’s healthcare initiatives where he has leveraged his decades of experience in healthcare, enterprise applications and systems architecture to design high performance infrastructures for the Epic EHR application and the client systems such as VDI for the access tier. He has also been directly engaged with the OST analytics team on assisting customers in the adoption of analytics to create substantial value and new revenue opportunities leveraging Big Data. In this space the combination of architecture, data visualization and design can be used to develop important new actionable insights.

Jim sits on the advisory board for the computer science/IS departments of Calvin College and Grand Valley State University Computer Science. He is an avid reader of all types of non-fiction and literature and most mornings can be found paddling a kayak, canoe or SUP before work. On the weekends, family and serving with his wife Ann at their church is a major focus.

Lastly, we must confess that some of OST’s peculiar culture is a direct derivation of Jim’s unorthodox style.

How do you justify an investment in IoT is Part III of the “IoT… are we all doing it wrong?” series. Check out Part I and Part II, then come back next week for part IV, why utilizing a layered testing approach is key in building an IoT platform.

IOT-Appliances

 

The Wall Street Journal recently published an article about GE Digital. To quote that article, “But the busi­ness case is to sell the prod­ucts [with IoT enablement] to its in­dustrial cus­tomers–like air­lines, power util­ities and hos­pi­tals — that are strug­gling to wring greater pro­ductiv­ity out of heavy ma­chin­ery in a time of slow global economic growth.”

At the Evanta CIO event OST participated in Minneapolis in June, the CEO of Ecolab, Doug Baker, described how with the advent of IoT and broad-based data collection for a variety of products, that the total material costs in which a customer pays may actually go down, which means they will save energy, water, and buy less product from Ecolab. So how does a company justify an investment in IoT when it will result in customers buying less product?

Like GE, it means that you will provide higher value to your customers, and that you will use the data provided by the systems to justify continued partnership and investment, and demonstrate that while you might be spending more per unit, that you will be spending less overall. It also introduces new opportunities for service lines that have never been imagined before. That’s what Ecolab is talking about, what GE is doing, and what some OST customers are conceptualizing.

I had a conversation with Rob Siegel, a lecturer at Stanford, over lunch on Thursday. He stated that the new digital economy with the data exhaust of billions of transactions, users and devices will create new economic models for the sale, lease and consumption of the products historically purchased as capital or consumable products. Companies must be able to creatively think about how new technology creates the opportunity for new business models. Investing in IoT solutions is a way for organizations to provide value to their customers beyond what was once even considered possible. It likely means looking at their business in a new way, and adapting to accommodate new processes. 

At OST, we are finding ways to help guide our customers through this journey of business transformation. Whether it is XaaS in the data center and cloud, or new business lines created around the solutions we build, helping the client envision this creates greater opportunity and differentiation for them.

From Design to Data Center: IT will work with our help.

 

Jim VanderMey

Chief Innovation Officer

Jim VanderMey is the Chief Innovation Officer for OST. Jim has provided the technical leadership and product strategic planning for the organization since the very beginning. Jim is a technology visionary who sets the long and short-term direction for OST. He specializes in seeing the “big picture” of technology, the computer industry, and the business objectives supported by IT. As OST has gained an international reputation, Jim has taught and spoken at conferences in Europe, Japan, and throughout North America.

Jim attended the Grand Rapids School of Bible and Music as a pastoral ministries major, and went on to manage significant scale applications and infrastructures in the healthcare, manufacturing, and insurance industries. He has served as a consultant to many large organizations such as Herman Miller, Boeing, Priority Health, Magna-Donnelly Corporation, Hewlett Packard, Amway, Meijer, Komatsu, Mercedes, Navistar (International Truck), Flextronics, the US Navy and many hospital systems including Spectrum Health, Bronson Hospital, and HealthEast.

Jim has senior level data center skills in performance analysis and systems architecture, enterprise UNIX, reliability engineering, SAN design and implementation. He is a voracious learner and has held many technical certifications ranging from UNIX and Cisco administration through cloud architecture and design. As OST has grown and diversified, Jim has engaged with clients on product strategy, IT transformation, cloud enablement, CIO-level organizational change management, DevOps and IoT program leadership. Creating value by connecting the Data Center disciplines of the past to the Design-centric disciplines to help businesses leverage technology more effectively is a place of special focus for Jim in his recent engagements.

Jim has been heavily involved in OST’s healthcare initiatives where he has leveraged his decades of experience in healthcare, enterprise applications and systems architecture to design high performance infrastructures for the Epic EHR application and the client systems such as VDI for the access tier. He has also been directly engaged with the OST analytics team on assisting customers in the adoption of analytics to create substantial value and new revenue opportunities leveraging Big Data. In this space the combination of architecture, data visualization and design can be used to develop important new actionable insights.

Jim sits on the advisory board for the computer science/IS departments of Calvin College and Grand Valley State University Computer Science. He is an avid reader of all types of non-fiction and literature and most mornings can be found paddling a kayak, canoe or SUP before work. On the weekends, family and serving with his wife Ann at their church is a major focus.

Lastly, we must confess that some of OST’s peculiar culture is a direct derivation of Jim’s unorthodox style.

Back to Top